Selected Health Indicators in North Dakota
Infectious Diseases

Chlamydia Trachomatis

Year 2000 Goal:
Reduce the incidence rate of
Chlamydia Trachomatis infections
to 170 per 100,000 people.

North Dakota Goal:
Reduce the incidence rate of
Chlamydia Trachomatis infections
to 120 per 100,000 people.

North Dakota 1990-1994:
194.6 per 100,000 people



Chlamydia is the most commonly transmitted bacterial pathogen in the United States.

Risk Factors:

Sexually active persons less than 20 years of age
  • Persons 20 years or older who have had:
    • A new sex partner in the last 60 days
    • More than one sex partner in the last 60 days

Tuberculosis

Year 2000 Goal:
Reduce tuberculosis to an incidence of
no more than 3.5 cases per 100,000
people.

North Dakota 1990-1994:
1.7 cases per 100,000 people



Immunizations

1995 CDC Goals: Percentage of
children immunized by age 24
months

3 DTP = 87 percent
3 Polio = 85 percent
1 MMR = 90 percent
3 to 4 Hib = 85 percent
3 HBV = 50 percent

1995 North Dakota: Percentage of children immunized by age 24 months

4 DTP = 83 percent
3 DTP = 96 percent
3 Polio = 88 percent
1 MMR = 91 percent
3 Hib = 94 percent
3 HBV = 39 percent



Eighty-one percent of North Dakota children are appropriately immunized by having had the following immunizations before their second birthday: 4 DTPs, 3 Polio, 1 MMR.

Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Polio, Haemophilus Influenza type B, and Hepatitis B (HBV) are diseases that are preventable by vaccination. Yet, for the vaccinations to be most effective in preventing these diseases, vaccinations must be administered during a child's first 24 months.

Measles

Year 2000 Goal:
Reduce indigenous cases of vaccine-preventable measles to 0 cases.

North Dakota 1990-1994:
0 cases

Measles
North Dakota has not had a measles case reported since 1987. Nationally, there was a significant increase in the number of measles cases reported from 1989 to 1991. This increase was attributed to low vaccination coverage.

Haemophilus Influenza type B (Hib)
Before the introduction of effective vaccines, Haemophilus Influenza type B was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis and other invasive bacterial diseases among children less than five years of age.

Cases of Hib in ND:
1990 - 14
1991 - 2

Since vaccination became mandatory in 1991, no North Dakota cases of Haemophilus Influenza type B have been reported.


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Last Updated: Thursday, May 23, 1996, 11:09:17 AM
Allen Johnson - ND Health Dept. DP Coordinator - ajohnson@state.nd.us